ABP, ACFA, CCA Statement on Canada-U.S. Border Disruption

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Source: Canadian Cattlemen’s Association

With the prolonged disruptions at the Canada-U.S. border crossing, Canada’s beef industry has serious concerns with supply chain challenges, including the lack of access to feed coming from the U.S. and impacts on cross border movement of cattle and meat products.

Alberta Beef Producers (ABP), Alberta Cattle Feeders’ Association (ACFA), and the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) are calling for a timely resolution and the restoration of our essential supply chain. ABP, ACFA, and CCA want to see the blockade resolved safely and effectively for truckers, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, producers, and all involved. In 2020, food and agriculture were deemed an essential service to continue moving supply chains during the pandemic, and it is critical agriculture continues to be able to operate without disruption.

The Canadian and American beef industries are highly integrated. Every day the industry is unable to move cattle, beef, or access feed puts the entire supply chain at risk. Canadian beef producers are already facing challenging supply issues from access to feed, following the devastating drought conditions in 2021, limited rail access, and trucking shortages.

Blocking the transport of beef to cross border consumers is slowing down processing in Canada and creating a backlog at processing facilities, feedlots and farms and ranches. The obstruction is also blocking the growing critical supplies of feed that are needed across western Canada.

ABP, ACFA, and CCA continue to monitor developments and work with the federal and provincial governments, and other stakeholders to keep all components of the beef supply chain functioning.

Quotes:

“The beef industry is aware of the situation evolving at the Canada-U.S. border crossing. Our focus remains on the people who are affected by immediate delays to the beef supply chain and ensuring the welfare of animals. Further impacts to cattle prices must be avoided.”
-Dr. Melanie Wowk, ABP Chair

“The unintended consequences of these closures and delays further affect already existing shortages on products like animal feed that have been caused by drought, trade disruptions, and transport issues. Transportation delays can severely impact the beef supply chain from cattle feed to grocery shelves.”
-Greg Schmidt, ACFA

“Maintaining a stable supply chain is critical to Canadian beef production. The evolving situation at the
U.S.-Canada border and the transportation delays are resulting in major impacts for the entire beef supply
chain.”
-Bob Lowe, CCA President

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